Alain Giguère

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21% of Canadians believe it’s okay to disobey laws they think are stupid! (And Siegfried by Richard Wagner)

Categories: Alain Giguère

Posted on 05-01-17 at 1:51 p.m.

Fantasies of civil disobedience!

One in every five Canadians indulges in this kind of thinking. What's more, the numbers have been on a continuous uptick for the last 13 years! It's as if these individuals see a progressively fraying "social contract," which legitimizes disobeying laws and contravening the basic rules of civil society. However, we are not suggesting that this indicates a systematic path to anarchy. These citizens don't spend their time breaking the law. But this fantasy is undoubtedly an expression of their frustration with what they believe life has in store for them.

It is interesting to note that we find little significant variation on a regional level. This "defiance" is found in similar proportions from coast to coast, with the exception of Québec, where the proportion of people in agreement with this notion, at 25%, is significantly higher.

Specifically, we asked people in a survey representative of the entire adult Canadian population (18+ years of age) whether they agreed with the following statement: "When you think a law is stupid, it's OK not to obey it."

To this same question in 2004, 12% of Canadians agreed. Since then, we've witnessed a nearly 10-point rise (9%). People are getting bolder and bolder!

Young people and harsh socio-economic conditions

The demographic and socio-economic profile of these "potential lawbreakers" provides some context. We find a clear over-representation of this attitude among young people (under 35), the lowest-income earners in society, as well as among labourers and blue-collar workers. We can easily imagine how financial pressures lead these groups to feel this way.


But what we find most troubling about these results is the rise since 2004. If deteriorating socio-economic conditions are stoking this defiance, it's not all that surprising that, in our post-2008 world, the fantasy of civil disobedience on the rise.

Repeatedly, our research results have clearly indicated that the Great Recession of 2008 was unlike recessions before it. In the past, people expected the economy to recover after a recession. After the Great Recession, Canadians saw the world as infinitely more uncertain, complex and risky, and became convinced that this new world order was here to stay.

It is in this context that we need to interpret this fantasy of civil disobedience. People have the impression that they are facing an increasingly difficult world and that society simply isn't there for them. Hence, for them, the social contract is broken.

Feeling excluded

When we analyze the personal values and mentalities of these potential lawbreakers, what motivates this kind of attitude becomes even clearer.

Fundamentally, these people feel excluded from society. They are unable to find a place, goals or meaning there. They feel powerless, as if they have no control over their lives. They feel left behind, that no one gives a damn about them. Therefore, if society has abandoned them, why should they fulfill their societal obligations? More proof of a broken social contract.

They are also very cynical about the establishment, the business and political elites. They think everyone is lying to them. They trust no one. They are very pessimistic about today's world. The youngest have a jaundiced impression of the world left to them by earlier generations. In this kind of environment, disobedience becomes a legitimate way to adapt to today's society.


A social project

I can almost hear my marketing colleagues concluding that the answer is more rebellious, irreverent and politically incorrect brand marketing platforms. Indeed, for certain target groups, such a strategy when properly executed will definitely pay off.

But the issue here goes beyond marketing opportunities. Our findings indicate the way that our society and our governments have been "managing" this exclusion. To curb it, our institutions and companies, via their social engagement, need to put their resources into programs that promote inclusivity, mutual aid and social integration.

The Ontario government is launching a pilot project in a few municipalities that will provide a basic minimum income to try supporting vulnerable workers and giving people the security and opportunity they need to achieve their potential. This could help them retrain or go back to school. Other similar initiatives should be put in place to halt the rise in fantasies of civil disobedience-and even stop them from becoming reality!

The Talented Mr. Robot: The Impact of Automation on Canada's Workforce, a recent report by the Brookfield Institute at Toronto's Ryerson University, concludes that nearly 42% of the Canadian labour force is at high risk of being affected by automation in the next 10-20 years!

If this scenario materializes, even minimally, we, as a society, will need a lot of creativity to fight the exclusion and civil disobedience it could engender (though, we hope, not anything as extreme as the world of "Mad Max"!).

Richard Wagner's Siegfried

Viewed from a more philosophical perspective, all eras undergo movements of civil disobedience. Youth tend to be critical of the preceding generation's regime and want to be rid of it, to take their rightful place. In their analyses of primitive societies, anthropologists talk about "symbolic castration," symbolic patricide-the father being the author of the laws and rules.

This is precisely the theme of the third act of Siegfried, the third opera in Wagner's four-part Ring cycle (The Ring of the Nibelung). Siegfried meets his grandfather, Wotan, the supreme god, who carries a spear engraved with the laws and rules governing the world. Wotan protects access to his daughter (Siegfried's aunt), who sleeps within a ring of fire. Siegfried breaks the spear, defeats Wotan (castration) and makes off with his aunt! When Wagner created this work in 1876, Freud's psychoanalytical texts had yet to be written!

The extract here is the overture to the third act, a magnificent orchestral foreshadowing of the drama to come (the castration, the aunt, everything!).

Wagner: Der Ring des Nibelungen - Complete Ring Cycle (James Levine, Metropolitan Opera), Siegfried Jerusalem, Hildegard Behrens, James Morris, Brian Large (Director), Deutsche Grammophon, New York, 2002.

Human Resources Week – Health and Wellness of Quebec workers

Categories: CROP in the news

Posted on 04-27-17 at 2:08 p.m.

With the advent of the Human resources week, the Ordre des conseillers en ressources humaines agréés (CRHA) commissioned CROP to measure Quebec workers’ opinion on health and wellness in the workplace. The results of our survey revealed that a majority of workers in Quebec feel it important that employers take steps to promote the health and well-being of their employees.

More details in CRHA’s press release and the media articles below (french only).

Click here for CRHA’s press release

Click here for the article in Journal de Montréal

Click here for the article on Canoe.ca

Public funding: no to sports, yes to transport

Categories: CROP in the news

Posted on 04-25-17 at 2:31 p.m.

In a study commissioned by La Presse, CROP proceeded to probe Quebecers’ about their thoughts on the funding of various projects by the government. The study results suggested that Quebecers would rather have their public funds invested in major projects involving transports or economic development than initiatives that promote professional sports.

For the full article on La Presse, please click here (french only).

65% of Canadians tell us they believe in God, while 49% consider their religious beliefs to be important to them (And St. Mathew Passion by Johann Sebastian Bach)

Categories: Alain Giguère

Posted on 04-10-17 at 6:25 p.m.

Religious beliefs in continuous decline for almost 20 years!

For this Holy Week, I have decided to examine our data on the religious beliefs of Canadians. A substantial percentage of the public-49%, one in two Canadians-say that their religious beliefs are important to them. There are some interesting regional variations: the least religious reside in Québec and British Columbia (43%); the most religious, in Alberta and the Atlantic provinces (56%).

Nevertheless, the churches are empty. Religious belief seems more a case of cultural heritage than the expression of a sustained practice of worship. As such, the difference between believing God and religious beliefs is telling: people feel less need of a Church to "connect" with God.

The trends are telling, too. While 65% of Canadians say they believe in God, this percentage has been in continuous decline, down from 81% in 2005. A similar trend obtains for religious beliefs. The numbers who tell us that religion is important to them have dropped from 70% of the population in 2000 to 49% in 2017.


The future of religious beliefs in Canada

Despite the media attention given to religion as it relates to the influx of immigrants, in the population as a whole, religious beliefs have been steadily waning for nearly 20 years. Religious people are gradually disappearing from our lives. Whether we are talking about Protestants in English Canada or Catholics in Québec, the trend is the same. At this rate, "if trends continue," within a generation (25 years), religious beliefs could become a completely marginal phenomenon.

Of course, such a scenario is based on the current trend and doesn't account for the growing role of immigration in the coming years. Even so, the acculturation of immigrant children by the school system might still help maintain the trend. Even if immigration helps religious people maintain their weight in society, they will not be Christian. They will be Taoist, Sikh, Hindu, Buddhist, Muslims, etc. And it will likely be a question of cultural heritage, a set of myths that give meaning to life without necessarily requiring ecclesiastical rites.

I admit that this scenario is based on the projection of current trends and that one must be cautious when attempting to predict the future. But we have been observing these trends for almost 20 years, and the younger people are in age, the less prevalent their religious beliefs (which surely offers some predictive value). Will immigration change the situation? We'll see.

Our relationship to the sacred

People tend to construct their own image of God, and he is more like a guardian angel than an "old man with a long white beard." A plurality of almost two out of five Canadians (37%), and the same percentage in Québec, believe in their own constructed image of God. Only 22% of Canadians believe in the God depicted by their church (14% in Québec).

On the other hand, a belief in a "force" that connects us to nature, the cosmos, the universe, is one of the strongest rising trends. We are witnessing a depersonalization of the divine, a kind of postmodern Buddhism that makes people feel that they are participating in the divine, that they are a part of it, just as nature is ("May the force be with you!"). Adherence to this pantheist vision has grown from 11% of the Canadian population in 1998 to 21% in 2016 (up from 14% to 28% in Québec).

Finally, atheism-a vision of life as merely a biological phenomenon-rose from 7% in 1998 to 20% in 2016 in Canada (from 8% to 21% in Québec).

Personal values and hot buttons as they relate to the divine

Examining people's values helps us better understand why the God of our churches is taking such a beating in popular beliefs. Those who believe in a traditional deity have very traditional and very conservative values. They respect the authority of institutions; they are fatalistic, have little control over their lives-and turn to God for leadership!

Those who construct their own personal God have difficulty living with the complexity and uncertainties of today's world. They feel potentially excluded from society, and threatened by it. Therefore, their God becomes a kind of guardian angel who watches over them.

The believers in a divine force and atheists, the two groups in continuous growth mode over the past 20 years, are in total ideological opposition to the Church (whether Catholic or Protestant). They reproach the Church for basing its role on prohibitions, submission, sin and punishment. They insist, to paraphrase Mr. Trudeau (the elder), that the Church has no place in people's bedrooms. They feel in full control of their lives, and aspire to independence and self-fulfillment.

A challenge for organized religion (especially the Christian, Catholic and Protestant Churches)

If they want to stay socially relevant, these institutions have some serious catching up to do to get back in sync with people's values. The gap between the tenets of organized religion and the reality of most people's lives has widened to an abyss! Only a tiny minority of Canadians believe in a Church-sanctioned God. Over the years, the notion of God has exploded into a myriad of different forms, culturally better adapted to the times.

This is an ironic situation if we consider Christ's message-to bring the subject back to Holy Week. Christ preached compassion, openness to others, kindness, generosity, selflessness and love, virtues that the Church does not represent for those who oppose the Church vision of God. But these virtues are precisely the ones so desperately needed in our times. Despite the marginalization of the Christian churches, perhaps these holy weeks can reconcile us to Christ's wisdom.

St. Mathew Passion by Johann Sebastien Bach

Of all the musical pieces appropriate for Holy Week, Bach's St. Mathew Passion is probably the most moving. This work oozes pain, tears and contrition. The excerpt I have chosen is in fact "the contrition aria": the mezzo-soprano sings the pain of the apostle Peter when he realizes that, as Christ predicted, before the cock crowed, he denied Christ three times ("I do not know this man"). Sublime!

J. S. Bach, St Matthew Passion, BWV244: Mark Padmore (Evangelist), Christian Gerhaher (Jesus), Camilla Tilling (soprano), Magdalena Kozena (mezzo-soprano), Topi Lehtipuu (tenor), Thomas Quasthoff (bass), Berliner Philharmoniker, Rundfunkchor Berlin, Knaben des Staats- und Domchors Berlin, Sir Simon Rattle, conducting; staging by Peter Sellars

The 2017 Panorama of Canadian consumers and citizens is beginning to emerge …

Categories: Perspectives

Posted on 04-05-17 at 11 a.m.

Consumption, innovation, gaming, escape ... people's craving for them is unrelenting. 

All this while an apocalyptic vision of today's world and a crisis of trust in our elites continue to advance!

The 2017 vintage of our Panorama program is gradually appearing on our tables. And what a superb vintage it is: fruity and full-bodied, with notes of citrus and tannin!

But seriously ...

An apocalyptic vision of today's world is on the rise. The environment, the economy, society-everything is changing too fast, making people feel that the end times are near, or at least the end of an era and the beginning of generalized chaos. Cynicism and a crisis of trust in the elites in our society continue to advance.

Yet, on a personal level, people are displaying a new vitality. They are adapting. They are learning to live with our times. People want to learn, continuously improve, develop their capabilities.

Also, they seek escape, amusement, new experiences, be they sensual or highly intense.

And everything is culminating in a record-breaking desire to consume. High debt loads may be curbing consumers' ability to spend but their need for escape is stoking their desire to consume!

However, they do not want to pay! Price has become consumers' No. 1 purchasing criterion.

Great opportunities for the brands and organizations positioned on these trends.

Let us help you get there!

Learn more ...